EURES helps Spanish engineers find jobs in Germany

12.09.2011

While some countries in Europe are struggling with high unemployment, others are finding it difficult to recruit skilled workers to fill vacancies in a number of sectors. This is certainly the case for Germany, which is bouncing back from recession and currently on a recruitment drive.
While some countries in Europe are struggling with high unemployment, others are finding it difficult to recruit skilled workers to fill vacancies in a number of sectors. This is certainly the case for Germany, which is bouncing back from recession and currently on a recruitment drive.
 
In January 2011, German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced that Germany would need an extra 100 000 engineers over the next decade to fill vacancies and ensure that the country remains competitive in the global economy, as reported by El Pais. A lack of skilled workers at home means that the country must look outside its borders. 
 
In response to the increased need for skilled workers, the Spanish and German Chambers of Commerce in association with EURES organised a series of recruitment events in Barcelona and Madrid, Spain. It’s a win-win situation - while German companies are struggling to fill engineering jobs, Spain has more than four million people out of work. 
 
“For skilled people without jobs in Spain it’s good that they can find an experience abroad. And if, or when, they come back with their international experience they will be able to find a better position here. Germany gets the skilled workers it needs. So it’s good for both countries involved,” explains Marisa Carmona, EURES Adviser in Tenerife, Spain, who is involved in the EURES team organising the events. 
 
Are potential candidates required to speak German? According to Marisa it tends to depend on the size of the company. “Most companies require a high level of German but there are always some that ask for a basic knowledge of German but fluent English. In general, if it’s an international company they will be used to employing foreign workers. If it’s a small to medium-sized company (SME) then German is a must,” she says.
 
Dr. Beate Raabe, the Press, Marketing and Information Manager at ZAV – the German PES working with EURES Spain, added that: “As more than 90% of German companies are small and medium sized, at least 19 out of 20 employees will have to speak German in their job”.
 
Over 100 job seekers turned up to listen to morning seminars on European job mobility at the two events in Barcelona and Madrid in June 2011. In the afternoon German companies such as BMW, Ferchau, Alchemy, and Aixtron Dataschalt interviewed a total of 80 candidates who had been pre-selected with the help of the EURES teams in Spain and Germany.
 
 
Read more:
 
 
 
Look for a Job Day in the EURES Events Calendar
 
Find out more about the working and living conditions in different European countries on the EURES Job Mobility Portal
 
Search for a job in the EURES Job Database
 
 
 

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